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"Own Your History"


A leadership course on the creative edge

WHITE SUPREMACY TRIUMPHANT

WHITE SUPREMACY TRIUMPHANT

To understand today’s problems, we must understand the depths of the American Apartheid white supremacy system, 1880-1950. In the South, an oppressive, fear-based system of legal and social segregation, economic subordination, and denial of political rights was enforced on former slaves. Outside the South, especially after the black migration north and west, racial prejudices, separation, discrimination, lack of equal opportunity,redlining, and economic inequality were common.

15. “Slavery by another name” and its consequences in the South, 1880-1920,

After Reconstruction, the Southern states developed a neo-slave “Jim Crow” system of legal segregation in a society characterized by racism, race subordination, economic peonage (including a horrific convict lease system), lynchings, fear and political powerlessness for African-Americans.

Questions:

Why did this system develop as it did? What were its most salient characteristics? Why did the North and federal government acquiesce? What forces for change resulted from this system? To what extent did this system foster rural white poverty?

Methods:

Students will develop a truth-and-reconciliation commission process for role-players to tell individual stories for the range of participants in this system.

(a) Truth and reconciliation commission in Birmingham, 1915— focusing on convict leasing and lynchings.
(b) Student project on race: “whiteness,” “blackness,” and ethnicity (part I)

16.American apartheid–North, 1920-1950,

In the 20th century, hundreds of thousands of black southerners moved north to escape the Southern fear-based system that denied opportunity. Race relations—including segregation, subordination, and racism —became a more significant matter nationwide. White supremacy prevailed. Progressivism and the New Deal did not address this American apartheid system, discriminatory practices and policies were prevalent, and antiblack violence occurred in cities outside the South.

Questions:

In what ways were the North and West after the Great Migration similar to the South, and how did they differ? Methods: Students will develop a truth-and-reconciliation commission process for role-players to tell individual stories for the range of participants in this system.

Methods:

(a) Truth and reconciliation commission in Chicago, 1935 –focusing on discrimination in jobs, education, and housing

(b) Student project on race: “whiteness,” “blackness,” and ethnicity (part II).